HTTP Status Codes Cheat Sheet

When you attempt to access a URL, you will receive an HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) status code in response. The status code is issued by the server to the client that made the request. Below is a quick cheat sheet of all the HTTP status codes with links to more information about the status code.

Types of HTTP status code responses

The first digit identifies the class of the the type of status code response.

1XX Informational Responses

The 1xx (Informational) class of status code indicates an interim response for communicating connection status or request progress prior to completing the requested action and sending a final response. 1xx responses are terminated by the first empty line after the status-line (the empty line signaling the end of the header section). Since HTTP/1.0 did not define any 1xx status codes, a server MUST NOT send a 1xx response to an HTTP/1.0 client[1].

A client MUST be able to parse one or more 1xx responses received prior to a final response, even if the client does not expect one. A user agent MAY ignore unexpected 1xx responses[2].

A proxy MUST forward 1xx responses unless the proxy itself requested the generation of the 1xx response. For example, if a proxy adds an “Expect: 100-continue” field when it forwards a request, then it need not forward the corresponding 100 (Continue) response(s)[3].

2XX Successful Responses

The 2xx Successful class of status code indicates that the client’s request was successfully received, understood, and accepted[4].

  • 200 OK
  • 201 Created
  • 202 Accepted
  • 203 Non-Authoritative Information
  • 204 No Content
  • 205 Reset Content
  • 206 Partial Content
  • 207 Multi-Status (WebDAV)
  • 208 Already Reported (WebDAV)
  • 226 IM Used (HTTP Delta encoding)

3XX Redirects

  • 300 Multiple Choice
  • 301 Moved Permanently
  • 302 Found
  • 303 See Other
  • 304 Not Modified
  • 305 Use Proxy
  • 306 unused
  • 307 Temporary Redirect
  • 308 Permanent Redirect

4XX Client Errors

  • 400 Bad Request
  • 401 Unauthorized
  • 402 Payment Required
  • 403 Forbidden
  • 404 Not Found
  • 405 Method Not Allowed
  • 406 Not Acceptable
  • 407 Proxy Authentication Required
  • 408 Request Timeout
  • 409 Conflict
  • 410 Gone
  • 411 Length Required
  • 412 Precondition Failed
  • 413 Payload Too Large
  • 414 URI Too Long
  • 415 Unsupported Media Type
  • 416 Range Not Satisfiable
  • 417 Expectation Failed
  • 418 I’m a teapot
  • 421 Misdirected Request
  • 422 Unprocessable Entity (WebDAV)
  • 423 Locked (WebDAV)
  • 424 Failed Dependency (WebDAV)
  • 425 Too Early
  • 426 Upgrade Required
  • 428 Precondition Required
  • 429 Too Many Requests
  • 431 Request Header Fields Too Large
  • 451 Unavailable For Legal Reasons

5XX Server Errors

  • 500 Internal Server Error
  • 501 Not Implemented
  • 502 Bad Gateway
  • 503 Service Unavailable
  • 504 Gateway Timeout
  • 505 HTTP Version Not Supported
  • 506 Variant Also Negotiates
  • 507 Insufficient Storage (WebDAV)
  • 508 Loop Detected (WebDAV)
  • 510 Not Extended
  • 511 Network Authentication Required

References

We like to give credit where credit is due. This article contains 2 references with a total of 4 citations.

  1. [1] [2] [3] Fielding, Roy T, And Julian F Reschke. "6.2. Informational 1xx." HTTP/1.1 Semantics and Content, IETF Trust, 1 Jun. 2014, tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7231#section-6.2

  2. [4] Fielding, Roy T, And Julian F Reschke. "6.3. Successful 2xx." HTTP/1.1 Semantics and Content, IETF Trust, 1 Jun. 2014, tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7231#section-6.3

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